Quotes

Celebrating ‘Connecticut Author’s Day’

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CTAuthorDaySept1“The State of Connecticut has been and continues to be home to countless talented local authors, from world renowned literary figures including Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe, to authors that are lesser known but equally deserving of recognition …”

ThaUnexpectedGracet’s Finding Dadan excerpt from the proclamation Gov. Dannel Malloy issued to named today “Connecticut Authors’ Day” in the Nutmeg State.

Celebrations included an invitation-only reception at the Mark Twain House in Hartford featuring best-selling Connecticut authors June Hyjek (also president of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales, Connecticut chapter) and Kara Sundlun (also an Emmy Award-winning journalist), shown at right, and several state officials. More than 60 people attended.

“When you look at the names of those who have lived and created here, from Mark Twain to Dominick Dunne, you see the shaping of America’s culture,” Hyjek said. “While the bold-faced names get most of the attention, this day intends to celebrate all authors who choose to call Connecticut home. Books combat illiteracy. Even if a book doesn’t become a bestseller, it doesn’t mean that it hasn’t added value to someone’s life. Every book is important; every author is important.”

Among the authors with Connecticut connections noted at today’s reception were Pulitzer Prize-winners including A. Scott Berg (Lindbergh), Annie Proulx (The Shipping News) and Bill Dedman (The Color of Money), along with best-sellers Stephanie Meyer (Twilight), Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love), Jay McInerney (Bright Lights, Big City) and Candace Bushnell (Sex and The City).

How are each of these authors linked to Connecticut?

  • Scott Berg was born in Norwalk
  • Annie Proulx was born in Norwich
  • Bill Dedman lives in Fairfield County
  • Stephanie Meyer and Jay McInerney were born in Hartford
  • Elizabeth Gilbert was born in Waterbury and grew up on a small family Christmas tree farm in Litchfield
  • Candace Bushnell was born and raised in Glastonbury

 

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Last night I dreamed of Nauquasset again.

This is the first line of Rachel Pastan’s Alena, which as anyone familiar with the 1938 novel Rebecca knows was inspired by Daphne du Maurier’s timeless and classic gothic story of Mrs. Danvers and the two Mrs. de Winters. The first line of Rebecca: “Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.”

Like the heroine of Rebecca, the heroine of Alena remains nameless throughout this provocative and spellbinding tale. But rather than take readers to an isolated gray stone mansion on coast of England, Alena takes readers to a progressive art museum on the coast of Massachusetts–where, like the second Mrs. de Winter, the new, young curator finds herself haunted by the legacy of her predecessor.

Alena was released in paperback earlier this month and is an ideal book to enjoy outside on a park bench, at the beach or under the hugging branches of an oak or willow tree. It’s so wonderful spring has finally arrived! We had the pleasure of interviewing Rachel for the Literary New England Radio Show when Alena was first published in hardcover in winter 2014.

Here is a mini Q&A with Rachel, though you can listen to our entire interview with her by clicking here.

When you got the phone call announcing you had sold a novel, how did you react?
I was at work, at my day job at the art museum—my novel takes place in an art museum—and I didn’t feel I could tell anybody. I just walked around in a daze for a while and then called my husband and my mother. That made it finally feel real.

Where did you get the idea for the novel?
I had gotten a full-time office cubicle job in my mid-forties, and there were lots of things I didn’t know how to do: use the complicated copy machine, format letters in Microsoft Word. People kept talking to me about the person who’d had the job before me, whose name was Elysa. They would say, “Elysa used to do it this way.” It made me crazy. Then one day I thought, It’s just like the novel Rebecca (in which a new wife is tormented by comparisons to the dead wife), only in the workplace. And then I thought, “That’s a good idea for a novel!”

What scene or bit of dialogue in the book are you most proud of, and why?
I’m very proud of the end of the book. My novel is a version of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, which lots of people have read and loved. So I had to think of something for my ending that honored Rebecca’s ending, but that was also different and surprising. I always wish I could read the ending when I give presentations at bookstores, but of course you can’t do that.

Who’s your favorite character in the book, and why? Who was the most fun to write?
I love my main character (who doesn’t have a name; actually she does have one, but I’m the only person who knows it), because she keeps her sanity and finds peace, despite everything. I loved writing Agnes, the business manager at the museum, a spooky, large, middle-aged woman—often compared to a crow or some other big bird—who wears black dresses and dyes her hair pink and does her best to make the narrator miserable.

If there was one thing in the main character’s life that you’d like to have in your own life, what would it be? What one thing in the character’s life would you never want?
I’d like to have an apartment in San Francisco with a balcony. I’d never want to have to work for a selfish, shallow, petty boss like Louise!

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Once I started researching, I quickly realized that the truth about what happened to the inhabitants of Boston during the two and a half years between the Boston Tea Party in December 1773 and the evacuation of the British troops in March 1776 was much more complex, disturbing, inspiring, and just plain interesting than I could have ever imagined.

Author Nathaniel Philbrick on Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution. Hear our interview with him – and win a copy of Bunker Hill – on the June 10 Literary New England Radio Show