It’s #SiblingsDay, and These Sibling Novels Will Stay with You Forever

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Cindy here, and once again I say thank goodness for Twitter! Without it, I would have never known April 10 was National Siblings Day, or that an organization dedicated to making it a federally recognized holiday existed. Pretty neat!

Reading #SiblingsDay Tweets recommending non-fiction parenting books, children’s books and others made me wonder about the books I’ve read about siblings, and 10 almost immediately came to mind as being among the most memorable. They’re all novels. And I’ve listed them here in no particular order, though I always like to give a shout-out for Tell the Wolves I’m Home, which in 2012 I marked as my No. 1-favorite book that year. It’s still among my all-time favorites.

As host of the Literary New England Radio Show, I’ve also been fortunate enough to interview several of terrific the authors included here, including Jodi Picoult, Julia Glass, Carol Rifka Brunt, Diane Setterfield and Krassi Zourkova. Julia, in fact, I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing twice. She’s just amazing.

What are some of your favorite siblings books? Tweet me at @LitNewEngland or @WriterCindyWB. I want to know, and I’ll definitely Tweet you back!

My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
The story of 13-year-old Anna, who decides to sue her parents for the rights to her own body, rather than undergo another surgery to help save the life of her older sister Kate. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate, who has leukemia. A powerful story about what it means to be a good parent, a good sister and a good person. My Sister’s Keeper was also made into a film, but the book and film are quite different.

The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy
Lush, mesmerizing and written by The Master Storyteller, it’s the story of a destructive family relationship, where a violent father abuses his wife and children. The story is narrated by one of the Wingo family children, Tom, a former high school teacher and coach who’s out of work after a nervous breakdown. Secrets are slowly revealed as Tom tells about his growing-up years on an isolated Southern island and the fate of his older brother Luke, as well as he tries to help his twin sister Savannah, a poet recovering from a suicide attempt. It’s thick, rich and fantastic. Loved the film, too, but not nearly as much as this magnificent book.

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt
A portrait of the late-‘80s AIDS epidemic’s transformation of a girl and her family. Before her Uncle Finn died of an illness people don’t want to talk about, 14-year-old June Elbus thought she was the center of his world. A famous and reclusive painter, Finn made her feel uniquely understood, privy to secret knowledge like how to really hear Mozart’s Requiem or see the shape of negative space. When he’s gone, she discovers he had a bigger secret: his longtime partner Toby, the only other person who misses him as much as she does. Her clandestine friendship with Toby—who her parents blame for Finn’s illness—sharpens tensions with her sister, Greta, until their bond seems to exist only in the portrait Finn painted of them. You’ll never forget this book.

The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory
Sisterly rivalry is the basis of this marvelously cinematic and sexy retelling of the story of Anne Boleyn. She, her sister Mary and brother George are brought to King Henry VIII’s court as players in their uncle’s plans to advance the family’s fortunes. Mary, the sweet, blond sister, wins King Henry VIII’s favor. But then her dark, clever, scheming sister Anne, insinuates herself into Henry’s graces, becoming his adviser and confidant. Soon she displaces Mary as his lover and begins her machinations to rid him of his wife, Katherine of Aragon. And that’s just the beginning. The Other Boleyn Girl was also made into a film. The film was OK, and I think I’d have liked it better if I’d watched it before I read the book. But when you put the film against the book, there’s really no comparison to which is better. The book won’t ever let you go.

We The Animals by Justin Torres
If you haven’t read this yet, drop everything and get a copy right now. Then sit down and read it. It’s only 128 pages, so you’ll be done in a couple of hours, and they’ll be hours you won’t regret. W-o-n-d-e-r-f-u-l book narrated by the youngest son of a Puerto Rican father and white mother raising three young sons in upstate New York. The novel is comprised of vignettes that, according to one spot-on reviewer, “paints a large picture through diminutive strokes. … Torres’s prose is fierce, grabbing hold of the reader and allowing him inside the wrenching, whirlwind of a life lived intensely.” Yes, yes, yes.

The Girls: A Novel by Lori Lansens
Conjoined twins Rose and Ruby Darlen are linked at the side of the head, with separate brains and bodies. Born in a small town outside Toronto in the midst of a tornado and abandoned by their unwed teenage mother two weeks later, the girls are cared for by Aunt Lovey, a nurse who refuses to see them as deformed or even disabled. At age 29, Rose, the more verbal and bookish twin, begins writing their story. Through it and Lansens, we see the sisters’ contradictory longing for independence and togetherness. It’s as mesmerizing as the girls themselves.

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
A tribute to du Maurier’s “Rebecca,” this gothic story tells the tale of a plain girl wrapped up in the dark, haunted ruins of a house that guards family secrets that are not her own, and that she must discover at her peril. Those secrets include two sisters, a governess, a ghost and more than one abandoned baby. Margaret, the heroine, is a little-known author and bookseller’s daughter who makes a romantic and compelling narrator. I was entranced.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Do I even need to describe it? One of the most beloved books of all time about sisters Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy growing up in New England, and learning the hard lessons of youth and poverty, during the Civil War. If you haven’t read it, you’re really missing out. Run now.

Wildalone by Krassi Zourkova
Really enjoyed this dark, imaginative debut that the publisher accurately describes as “a bewitching blend of Twilight, The Secret History, Jane Eyre and A Discovery of Witches.” It’s the story of college freshman Thea Slavin, who leaves her home in Bulgaria to attend Princeton, where she becomes tangled in solving the mystery of her sister’s disappearance and the lives of two handsome, dangerous and secretive brothers. Her desires lead her into a sensual, mythic underworld that’s as irresistible as it is dangerous. “Irresistible” is a good word to describe this book, too.

I See You Everywhere by Julia Glass
Julia is one of my all-time favorite writers. Loved, loved, loved her National Book Award-winning Three Junes and every book that’s followed, including this one about sisters Louisa and Clem and their complicated relationship. Louisa is conscientious and careful, while Clem is a rebel. Theirs is a vivid, heart-wrenching story about what we can and can’t do for those we love.

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